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‘A Gut Feeling:’ ISB’s Dr. Sean Gibbons on the importance of the human microbiome

“The human body isn’t strictly human. This new organ that we’re coming to recognize as the microbiome is part and parcel to the functionality of the whole system, and if it breaks down, if it starts to fall apart, we start to get sick,” said Dr. Sean Gibbons, ISB’s newest faculty member, in a WGBH Forum Network presentation.

You can watch the entire presentation by clicking play above. To learn more about Gibbons, please read his Q&A here.

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