News

Dr. Annie Levine joins the lab

Dr. Annie Levine joins the lab as a clinical fellow. Annie is a fellow in pediatric gastroenterology at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She graduated from Harvard with a BA in Slavic Languages and Literatures and earned her MD at the University of Pittsburgh in 2017. After completing her residency in pediatrics at Brown University in Providence, RI, she moved to Seattle in 2020 to start her clinical fellowship.
Annie has been doing research in inflammatory bowel disease since 2011, examining disease complications, the interplay between inflammation and mood, and interactions between the gut microbiome, diet, and the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. She looks forward to adding computational methods to her clinical and statistical tool kit in order to identify potential targets for innovative dietary and therapeutic interventions in inflammatory bowel disease.
Outside the lab, Annie enjoys sailing, scuba diving, cooking, opera, annoying her cats (Greylien and Pippin), and hiking with her corgi, Oliver, and husband David.

Recent Articles

  • Gut Microbiome Composition Predictive of Patient Response to Statins

    New ISB research shows that different patient responses to statins can be explained by the variation in the human microbiome. The findings were published in the journal Med, and suggest that microbiome monitoring could be used to help optimize personalized statin treatments.

  • Dr. Jack Gilbert on the State of the Microbiome Field

    In the final ISB-Town Hall Seattle Science Series of 2021, ISB Assistant Professor Dr. Sean Gibbons sat down with UCSD Professor Dr. Jack Gilbert, and the two microbiome experts discussed past research, exciting science happening today, promising products and therapies on the horizon, and much more. 

  • Microbiome and weight loss

    Can You Lose Weight? Ask Your Microbiome

    The strongest associations with weight loss success or failure – independent of BMI – are found in the genetic capacity of the gut microbiome. These new findings open the door to diagnostic tests that can identify people likely to lose weight with healthy lifestyle changes and those who might need more drastic interventions.