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Nick Bohmann Joins the Lab

Nick Bohmann joins the lab as a Ph.D. student from the Molecular Engineering and Sciences program at UW. Nick graduated from Virginia Tech in 2019 with B.S. in Biological Systems Engineering. His research interests include genome-scale metabolic modeling and ‘omics based computational biology, specifically related to the human gut microbiome. Nick’s work in the lab will focus on using computational tools to enhance the predictive capability of models of the microbiome, and eventually use insights from these models to develop interventions for disease. Ultimately, he hopes to apply new understanding gained through a systems biology approach to translational medicine, improving human health and wellness in the process. 
 
Outside the lab, Nick enjoys bicycling, hiking the Cascade and Olympic Ranges, and reading nonfiction. He is originally from Heidelberg, Germany and grew up in Rochester, New York. 

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