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Global Microbiome Conservancy

The Global Microbiome Conservancy is a non-profit collaboration between scientists and communities around the world, unified around a common goal: to collect and preserve the full biodiversity of human gut microbes for future generations. The work of the conservancy is centered on four core goals:

Conservation

We dedicate our efforts to conserve an invisible, intimate and crucial biodiversity of the human body: the gut microbiome. By culturing, isolating and storing gut bacteria, we are building an open, non-profit and global library of our microbial heritage.

Representation

We are strongly committed in working with a wide variety of human populations worldwide, including under-represented and indigenous peoples, to promote inclusion in microbiome science. Participants conserve the ownership of their microbiomes.

Capacity building

Our global consortium promotes capacity building in partner institutions through scientific training and local research support.

Advancing knowledge

We generate microbiome resources for the research community to advance science and promote human health. Using these resources we will tackle big scientific questions on the human microbiome. We will strongly engage in outreach and educational activities to promote the objectives of the Conservancy and spread knowledge on the microbiome.

The Gibbons Lab is a member of the Global Microbiome Conservancy’s scientific consortium and helps in efforts to sample indigenous peoples in North America.

–photo credit: Christopher Corzett

Recent Articles

  • Making Nutrition and Healthcare Personalized, Predictive, and Preventive

    Dr. Sean Gibbons is creating a new precision nutrition platform called My Digital Gut that leverages the gut microbiome to make nutrition and healthcare personalized, predictive, and preventive. In an ISB Research Roundtable presentation, Gibbons spoke about My Digital Gut and other microbiome-related projects studied in his lab.   

  • Crystal Perez joins the lab

    Crystal Perez, an MD/PhD student at the University of Washington (UW) in the Molecular Engineering Program, recently joined the lab. Crystal graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. and M.S. in Biology. During her time at Stanford, she worked in David Relman’s laboratory on a project investigating arsenic’s impact on the human gut microbiome of individuals chronically exposed through groundwater. She also completed an internship in E. Peter Greenberg’s lab…

  • Jacob Cavon Joins the Lab

    Jacob Cavon, PhD student in the Molecular Engineering and Sciences program at the University of Washington, recently jointed the lab. Jacob graduated from Montana State University, Bozeman with a BS in Cell Biology and Neuroscience. During his undergraduate career and post-graduation he characterized the function of an S. pyogenes virulence factor protein and contributed to a strep throat infection mouse model in Dr. Ben Lei’s lab. Before starting graduate school,…