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Global Microbiome Conservancy

The Global Microbiome Conservancy is a non-profit collaboration between scientists and communities around the world, unified around a common goal: to collect and preserve the full biodiversity of human gut microbes for future generations. The work of the conservancy is centered on four core goals:

Conservation

We dedicate our efforts to conserve an invisible, intimate and crucial biodiversity of the human body: the gut microbiome. By culturing, isolating and storing gut bacteria, we are building an open, non-profit and global library of our microbial heritage.

Representation

We are strongly committed in working with a wide variety of human populations worldwide, including under-represented and indigenous peoples, to promote inclusion in microbiome science. Participants conserve the ownership of their microbiomes.

Capacity building

Our global consortium promotes capacity building in partner institutions through scientific training and local research support.

Advancing knowledge

We generate microbiome resources for the research community to advance science and promote human health. Using these resources we will tackle big scientific questions on the human microbiome. We will strongly engage in outreach and educational activities to promote the objectives of the Conservancy and spread knowledge on the microbiome.

The Gibbons Lab is a member of the Global Microbiome Conservancy’s scientific consortium and helps in efforts to sample indigenous peoples in North America.

–photo credit: Christopher Corzett

Recent Articles

  • Using Blood to Predict Gut Microbiome Diversity

    Predicting the alpha diversity of an individual’s gut microbiome is possible by examining metabolites in the blood. The robust relationship between host metabolome and gut microbiome diversity opens the door for a fast, cheap and reliable blood test to identify individuals with low gut diversity.

  • Use and abuse of correlations

    We recently published a Perspective Article in the ISME Journal on the ‘Use and abuse of correlation analyses in microbial ecology.’ In this piece, we highlight the pitfalls of inferring microbe-microbe interactions from sequencing data. The lead author, Alex Carr, wrote a blog post titled ‘Inferring microbial interactions from relative abundance: not as easy as you would think’ detailing his inspiration for writing this perspective. You can check out the…

  • Seeing the microbiome through a host lens

    Sean recently published a commentary in the journal mSystems that outlines a vision of defining ‘microbiome health’ through a host lens: i.e. determining what exact components of the variation in the microboita influence host phenotypes. Much of the variation in the microbiome likely has nothing to do with the health state of the host, but loss/gain of critical diversity and/or functionality can have a major impact on host health. To…